Life cycle thinking is real

A new mini podcast series for the summer to help you understand the difference between life cycle assessments, sustainability, ESG reporting and for shipping, the well-to-wake question

What’s the difference between a life cycle assessment of a new marine fuel, and the well to wake analysis of its emissions?

 

What also is the difference between a life cycle assessment of clothing which is manufactured in Pakistan, shipped to Europe and then worn twice before being thrown away? How does tis assessment compare to the LCA of a shipowner with large tonnage, built in a yard with steel and using a lot of technology onboard?

 

How does life cycle thinking sit along ESG reporting? Are they compatible, given a life cycle assessment may suggest it is less environmentally damaging to maintain, upgrade and keep a building or ship in service rather than to pull it down, scrap and recycle it.

 

Investors eyes are also turning green. Not for any old dollar, but for ones that meet green investment criteria, and they are looking at their portfolios, and thanks to regulations such as the EU criteria, have now got tools to get what they want.

 

The industrial journey we are on a s a society has many paths, and while shipping has one which is borne out by a lot of regulations, both in existence now or in the pipeline, many of these discussions are born out of a social license and what is expected and not what is regulated.

 

Fathom. World has partnered with ReFLow, a Danish company focusing on helping companies with their life cycle assessments and helping them meet their social and mandated requirements.

 

This is six parts mini series we are launching to examine how industrial and maritime life cycle thinking has begun to bite.

 

Join Craig Eason, Fathom World editor and podcast host, and Rasmus Elsborg-Jensen, CEO and founder of ReFlow and EU climate pact ambassador for a summer of thinking.

 

Their journey will take them to manufacturers and suppliers, to shipowners and analysis, researchers and shipbuilders, to financial experts and fortune tellers (well maybe not fortune tellers, but those with the knowledge to predict the shape of future shipping)

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